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Ian Bishop defends his comment about Pakistan U19 pacer Ali Raza

Fifteen-year-old Ali Raza emerged as a standout performer, stunning the cricketing world with his exceptional bowling

Ian Bishop defends his comment about Pakistan U19 pacer Ali Raza PHOTO: AFP

Former West Indian fast bowler and renowned commentator, Ian Bishop, faced criticism from Pakistani sports journalist Waheed Khan for his comments on Pakistan U19 pacer, Ali Raza during the semi-final of U19 World Cup.

Fifteen-year-old Ali Raza emerged as a standout performer, stunning the cricketing world with his exceptional bowling. Raza claimed the crucial first wicket by dismissing Sam Konstas and continued to create obstacles for Australia by taking the wickets of Peake, Straker, and Beardman. His impressive spell of four wickets for 34 runs played a significant role in Pakistan's performance, despite the ultimate defeat.

During the match, when Ali Raza claimed the eighth wicket, Bishop, who was providing commentary at the time, referred to him as a 'superstar.' This led to criticism from Waheed Khan, who expressed disapproval of Bishop's tendency to lavish generous praise on young players.

In response to the criticism, Ian Bishop strongly defended his remarks, stating that he draws inspiration from his seniors and is committed to providing encouragement to young cricketers. He emphasized his belief in supporting and motivating emerging talents in the world of cricket.

 

@waheedkhan I was an ambitionless, drifting teenager when I first played senior cricket with Phil Simmons, against Marshall, Garner & later, Holding. I heard they’d said nice things about my game. That inspired me to believe in myself. I’ll never stop passing that on to others.

— Ian Raphael Bishop (@irbishi) February 9, 2024

 

Pakistan U19 went down fighting in a close encounter against Australia U19 in the ICC U19 World Cup semi-final, played at Willowmoore Park, Benoni. After being put to bat first, Pakistan U19 were dismissed for 179. In turn, Australia U19 managed to chase the target in the last over, with just one wicket in the bag.